Cooper’s Hawk

Accipiter cooperii

Cooper’s Hawk
Photo courtesy of Tom Grey

ACCIPITERS: This group of hawks have comparatively long tails, and short, rounded wings. They have greater agility and maneuverability for flight in woodlands. They fly with several quick wing beats and a glide. Accipiters feed mainly on birds and small mammals. Females are much larger than males.

Description:
Crow sized. Long tail, rounded at the tip, banded black and white, with white terminal tail band. Blue-gray back, rusty breast. Short winged. Length 14” – 20”, Wingspan 27” – 36”
Voice:
Loud, repeated kek-kek-kek-kek-kek call given during alarm
Food:
Preys primarily on songbirds, some small mammals. During breeding season it has regular feeding routes.
Nest:
A platform nest of sticks lined with bark. In trees 10-70’ above ground. Eggs 3-6, pale blue-green, rarely spotted.
Habitat:
Broken woodlands, streamsides, groves.
Range:
Throughout the US.
Migration:
Usually singly.
Comments:
May be seen perched on telephone poles, unlike the sharp-shinned hawk.